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SPECIAL FEATURE 2010

Labor Day 2010

Labor Day: How it Came About; What it Means Labor Day, the first Monday in September, is a creation of the labor movement and is dedicated to the social and economic achievements of American workers. It constitutes a yearly national tribute to the contributions workers have made to the strength, prosperity, and well-being of our country.

The First Labor DayThe first Labor Day holiday was celebrated on Tuesday, September 5, 1882, in New York City, in accordance with the plans of the Central Labor Union. The Central Labor Union held its second Labor Day holiday just a year later, on September 5, 1883. In 1884 the first Monday in September was selected as the holiday, as originally proposed, and the Central Labor Union urged similar organizations in other cities to follow the example of New York and celebrate a "workingmen's holiday" on that date. The idea spread with the growth of labor organizations, and in 1885 Labor Day was celebrated in many industrial centers of the country. –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––

Please find the full article at http://www.dol.gov/opa/aboutdol/laborday.htm

 

TODAY IN HISTORY: THE FIRST LABOR DAY. The Library of CongressOn September 5, 1882, some 10,000 workers assembled in New York City to participate in America's first Labor Day parade. After marching from City Hall, past reviewing stands in Union Square, and then uptown to 42nd Street, the workers and their families gathered in Wendel's Elm Park for a picnic, concert, and speeches. This first Labor Day celebration was eagerly organized and executed by New York’s Central Labor Union, an umbrella group made up of representatives from many local unions.  Debate continues to this day as to who originated the idea of a workers' holiday, but it definitely emerged from the ranks of organized labor at a time when they wanted to demonstrate the strength of their burgeoning movement and inspire improvements in their working conditions.

LABOR DAY 2010. U.S. Department of Labor

Labor Day, the first Monday in September, is a creation of the labor movement and is dedicated to the social and economic achievements of American workers. It constitutes a yearly national tribute to the contributions workers have made to the strength, prosperity, and well-being of our country.

YOUR RIGHTS AS A WORKER. U.S. Department of Labor

Do you have questions about the laws that protect you as a worker? Do you want to know more about your benefits because of a lay-off? These resources will point you to the information that you need. Review this information so that you know the questions you need to ask your employer.

FACTS FOR FEATURES: LABOR DAY 2010. U.S. Census Bureau

 The first observance of Labor Day is believed to have been a parade of 10,000 workers on Sept. 5, 1882, in New York City, organized by Peter J. McGuire, a Carpenters and Joiners Union secretary. By 1893, more than half the states were observing a “Labor Day” on one day or another, and Congress passed a bill to establish a federal holiday in 1894. President Grover Cleveland signed the bill soon afterward, designating the first Monday in September as Labor Day.

UNION MEMBERSHIP. U.S. Department of Labor’s Bureau of Labor Statistics

In 2009, the union membership rate--the percent of wage and salary workers who were members of a union--was 12.3 percent, essentially unchanged from 12.4 percent a year earlier, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics reported today. The number of wage and salary workers belonging to unions declined by 771,000 to 15.3 million, largely reflecting the overall drop in employment due to the recession. In 1983, the first year for which comparable union data are available, the union membership rate was 20.1 percent, and there were 17.7 million union workers.

 

OCCUPATIONAL OUTLOOK HANDBOOK, 2010-11 EDITION. U.S. Department of Labor’s Bureau of Labor Statistics

The Occupational Outlook Handbook is a nationally recognized source of career information, designed to provide valuable assistance to individuals making decisions about their future work lives. The Handbook is revised every two years.

 

MONTHLY LABOR REVIEW ONLINE. U.S. Department of Labor’s Bureau of Labor Statistics

Established in 1915, Monthly Labor Review is the principal journal of fact, analysis, and research from the Bureau of Labor Statistics, an agency within the U.S. Department of Labor. Each month, economists, statisticians, and experts from the Bureau join with private sector professionals and State and local government specialists to provide a wealth of research in a wide variety of fields—the labor force, the economy, employment, inflation, productivity, occupational injuries and illnesses, wages, prices, and many more.

  
CAREER GUIDE TO INDUSTRIES (CGI), 2010-11 EDITION. U.S. Department of Labor’s Bureau of Labor Statistics

For dozens of different kinds of industries—such as educational services, health care, and motor vehicle and parts manufacturing —the Career Guide to Industries tells you about occupations in the industry, training and advancement, earnings, expected job prospects, and working conditions. In addition, the Career Guide gives you links to information about the job market in each State and more. 

WHAT DO YOU LIKE? U.S. Department of Labor’s Bureau of Labor Statistics

This is a main home page for K-12 students from BLS Career Information that describes the nature, preparation, and future of various jobs in relation to a school subject.

 

U.S. Department of Labor
http://www.dol.gov/

U.S. Department of Labor's Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)
http://webapps.dol.gov/dolfaq/dolfaq.asp

U.S. Department of Labor's Bureau of International Labor Affairs (ILAB)
http://www.dol.gov/ilab/

U.S. Department of Labor's Bureau of Labor Statistics
http://stats.bls.gov/data/home.htm

Employment Situation News Release: July 2010 (USDL-10-1076)
http://www.bls.gov/news.release/empsit.htm

Mass Layoffs (Monthly) News Release: July 2010 (USDL-10-1143)
http://www.bls.gov/news.release/mmls.htm

The Origins of Labor Day – PBS
http://www.pbs.org/newshour/bb/business/september96
/labor_day_9-2.html

American Federation of Labor - Congress of Industrial Organizations
http://www.aflcio.org/

Info-Pedia USA: Holidays - Labor Day
For English, http://infopedia.usembassy.or.kr/ENG/_f_1006.html
For Korean, http://infopedia.usembassy.or.kr/KOR/_f_1006.html   

 

  

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